Do contractors in start-ups feel more valued than those in corporates?

Posting date:11 Sep 2019

We hear all too often that start-ups allow you to thrive. You can climb the ladder, work from home on occasion and possibly be privy to free pizza on a Friday but, what are the benefits to a contractor within the HR Transformation space and are they unrivalled in a start-up firm?

HR Transformation professionals are increasingly looking to smaller companies as a way of feeling valued in an age when they are forced to compete with the technology they are hired to implement.

Change Management professionals are vital during an HR transformation. They are required not just to introduce a programme but also to embed the change that is required within the culture and across the workforce as after all, it’s the people who need to evolve with the technology that remains beyond the implementation itself.

As a society, we do not all deal with change well and Brexit, IR35 and the onslaught of GDPR can verify this. Employees are no exception. 

Transformation professionals help make the transition smoother and ensure that when their contract is over, your workforce are equipped to continue to support ongoing change.

But, if the longevity of change is evidently just as valuable as the technology implemented – why is there such a disparity in how HR Transformation specialists are expected to deliver in big corporates vs start-ups?

I recently met with an HRIS Programme Director who spoke about the love-hate relationship she has with the technology she has delivered time and time again across a span of different types of companies. While enjoying her role, she discusses the rivalry she feels between herself and the software - How together they make huge change and it’s the technology that is coined revolutionary and somewhat heroic.

She spoke about how she can limit this feeling within a smaller company.“HR doesn’t just impact HR, it impacts everyone and therefore it’s my role to help embed change within an organisation and across its workforce. Despite having quite, a big responsibility, I feel almost invisible – blinded by the sparkly new technology that I help introduce.

“I don’t want to be a cog in the works. I want to be adding value and I want that value to be not just recognised but appreciated too. You need to embed that feeling of empowerment within the people you are working with and in a start-up, you not only have the ability to make a greater impact across the floor but also, you have a voice that is heard by stake-holders and a responsibility larger than the one you may have in a larger corporation.”

For full access to our recent white paper – Are you too corporate for a start-up? Follow the download link below.

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